Home / Recruiting Central / The recruitment challenge is finding better, faster ways to get to, qualify and hire that talent – Top 10 IT skills on demand

The recruitment challenge is finding better, faster ways to get to, qualify and hire that talent – Top 10 IT skills on demand

The IT market is growing, with companies hiring both permanent and contract resources for all software skills, and this is projected to continue for the foreseeable future, given the imbalance between supply and demand.

In Scotland alone there are between 7000 to 10,000 fewer people than there are roles in IT and this is projected to continue for the next five years. A recent UK skills report suggested that there were over 120,000 roles in IT in the UK and yet only 20,000 software graduates entered the market last year, so the gap is widening and is likely to remain for a good time to come.

shutterstock_165015113The current demand for IT skilled workers is still at a strong level reports Anthony Sherick, Managing Director at Technojobs. IT job levels are expected to grow by 20% by 2020 according to various estimates, especially in specific skillsets, for example Java, Cyber Security, Digital Media, .Net.

Sherick reports that demand for technology graduates in particular is at a high level, and thinks that this will ensure the healthy contracting market continues that is a way of life for many IT professionals.

Since 2010 technology graduate vacancies have risen over 50% which far outperforms the majority of other sectors.

Startups in the tech sector are starting to compete with bigger brands for tech talent, by offering attractive packages including share options and future pay-outs. “Thus the market is still characterised by an imbalance between supply and demand which makes quality of sourcing for good candidates very important,” comments Sherick.

Chris Rogers, Director of Cortex IT Recruitment says the challenge for them is that there is a chronic shortage. He sees a rise in permanent vacancies coming from companies wanting to grow a stable team rather than the effects of AWR (Agency Workers Regulations).
Rogers says the nature of recruitment projects varies from client to client; start-ups or companies who experience rapid growth in a short time often have to hire contractors for an interim period, whereas it takes longer to find a perm candidate and secure them.
So, the trend is upward for the IT sector with no signs of slowdown in growth.

Computerworld‘s Forecast 2016 survey, revealed that companies face stiff competition for top talent: 37% of the 182 organisations who responded to the survey said they plan to increase head count in the upcoming year (that’s a significant jump from last year, when only 24% said they planned to add new staff). Moreover, 24% of those polled this year listed “attracting new talent” as first among their business priorities for the next 12 months.

Here are the 10 skills on track to be most in demand, according to those who participated Computerworld‘s Forecast 2016 survey.

1. IT Architecture

* 42% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months.

The term “IT architect” encompasses a wide range of specialists, from enterprise architects to cloud architects, so recruiters say it makes sense that IT architecture expertise is in demand as companies move forward with all sorts of technology-driven projects.

2. Programming/Application Development

* 40% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months.

Despite fears that programming expertise is a commodity that can be obtained cheaply offshore, programming and application development continue to be among the most sought-after skills in enterprise IT.

Demand for Programmers and Developers is springing up in new areas, too, thanks to the rise of Mobile and the emergence of the ‘Internet of Things’. As an example, in the Automotive industry, some cars now come off the assembly line with a million lines of code – and this is just one evidence of how programming’s footprint is widening

3. Project Management

* 39% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months.

With almost half (46%) of the Forecast survey respondents expecting their technology spending to increase in 2016, it’s no surprise that project management remains a top five skill: More spending means more projects — and that means more people will be needed to manage those projects.

4.  Big Data

* 36% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months.

The surge in interest in using data to drive business has pushed demand for big data skills from No. 10 in last year’s Forecast report to No. 4 today. Moreover, in the Forecast 2016 survey, big data/analytics was No. 1 on the list of technologies that survey respondents said they were currently beta-testing or using in pilot projects, with 23% saying they were engaged in such initiatives.

5. Business Intelligence/Analytics

* 34% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months.

Holding steady in the top 10 skills list is another data-related area of specialisation: BI and analytics.

6. Help Desk/Technical Support

* 30% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months.

The recruiting model for Help Desk/Technical Support seems to be to find prospects recently graduated from college/university (people with a well-rounded education) in the belief that if candidates have ‘natural’ customer service skills and the ability to communicate, companies can then educate them on the tech skills.

7. Database Administration

* 25% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months.

Demand for Database Administrators remains high thanks to the ever-increasing interest in big data, BI and analytics. Employers want people with extensive backgrounds in database administration and a deep understanding of data reporting tools and technologies such as Oracle, SQL, DB2 and Hadoop.

8.  Security/Compliance/Governance

* 25% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months.

Although security expertise slipped from No. 4 on last year’s list of the 10 hottest tech skills, make no mistake about its importance: Security professionals are in demand and can command high salaries. Exactly 50% of those who participated in our Forecast 2016 survey said they plan to increase spending on security technologies in the next 12 months, and security was No. 2 among the most important IT projects that respondents have underway. Compensation for security pros keeps going up because demand for talented people is strong, and because security specialists play a critical role in most organisations.

9. Cloud/SaaS

* 25% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months.

Research firm IDC predicts that more than half of enterprise IT infrastructure and software investments will be cloud-based by 2018. Specifically, spending on public cloud services will grow to more than £100 billion by 2018, according to an IDC forecast report.

10.  Web Development

* 24% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months. * Last year’s ranking: No. 5

Web development continues to crack the Computerworld Forecast list of the top 10 most in-demand IT skills because organisations have come to rely heavily on the Web as a channel for connecting with customers, clients, partners and employees since they built their first websites a decade or two ago, IT leaders say. While they don’t need Web developers to establish a Web presence anymore, they do need people with the ability to ensure that their sites are open and ready for business.

So IT Recruitment will continue to remain a tough recruiting market and salaries will continue to go up with demand.

 

About Spiros Hub