Home / VIDEO Central / VIDEO & Research: Bhutan |The Happy City bases its policy on Gross National Happiness

VIDEO & Research: Bhutan |The Happy City bases its policy on Gross National Happiness

Bhutan-Happiness-is-a-Place-logo-2011-small

Jasper Bergink, contests that the assumption is that when a country becomes richer, its citizens will be better off.

But is that the case?

Research shows that the Western world is a lot richer than fifty years ago. At the same time, we are hardly any happier than in the 1950s. And the Social and Cultural Planning Agency (SCP) recently concluded that quality of life decreased between 2010 and 2012, for the first time in thirty years!

For Bhutan, a small Buddhist kingdom in the Himalayas, these conclusions do not come as a surprise. Since 1972, Bhutan based its policy on Gross National Happiness (GNH). GNH takes a broader approach than economic interests, and also helps the state to consider the influence of factors like health, mental well-being and community life. The video explains how it works.

After Bhutan, the UK, the OECD and the European Commission, focus on quality of life.

gross-national-happiness2

The British new economics foundation has researched five ways to well-being. These are factors that affect the happiness and well-being of an individual: connectbe active, take notice, keep learning and give. Cities can integrate some elements in their urban planning and design. Public spaces can be designed to facilitate that people meet each other (connect) or are invited to do sports (be active). Through education and community activities, city councils can promote skills and values that help us to appreciate the moment (take notice), be curious (keep learning) and share with others (give).

“A Little Dose of Happiness” is ‘s newsletter of For A State of Happiness. (Visit the site to subscribe or Send an email to jasper -at- forastateofhappiness.com)

About Dr. Ev D'aMigo; PhD

Check Also

buyyyy

Workplace trends: 4 myths about how work gets done and what we should be doing instead

Dr. Anna Akbari, a sociologist contests that not all workplace trends improve performance. From co-working …