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VIDEO & ANALYSIS: Emotional Intelligence for the Leader in all of us – How Good Leaders Become Great | Davis Executive Leadership Program

According to Richard H. Savel and Cindy L. Munro, Emotional Intelligence for the Leader in all of us:

The ability of leaders to be aware of their own
emotional states to help choose how they will
respond (rather than responding emotionally),
combined with high levels of empathy, allows them
to grow as leaders, gaining the trust of the people
they are leading and becoming role models for
appropriate behavior in the organization.

As we move along in our careers, we must keep passion alive, but also we must learn to temper and modulate our emotions as we take on progressively more responsibility.

Being successful requires more than just passion….

Emotional intelligence allows us to distance ourselves from our emotions just enough so we can function at a higher level.
Emotional intelligence also can help us to strategize by knowing ahead that there likely will be pushback or resistance during the initial presentation.

Plan for it. Expect it. Change is never easy.

shutterstock_150064880But it is easy—especially if it is your first time acting as a change agent—to become disheartened when you realize that not everyone is on the same page as you. Be at peace with that.

Use your EI to help you understand that wanting to make change is just the first step. Slowly, it will dawn on you that being successful requires more than just passion; it requires the development of an elusive combination of passion, resilience, follow-through, and EI.

Perhaps some people in your group will never be as excited as you are about implementing the new protocol. Let that be OK.

Become comfortable with the realization that, for those people, your leadership goals might be different. They may need to see the protocol fully implemented for some time before they are completely behind the project. In that case, your goal is to dissuade the naysayers from actively preventing your new protocol from being implemented.

The most difficult part of integrating the concepts of EI is striking a balance between keeping our youthful enthusiasm intact while tempering and modulating our emotions and emotional responses in important situations. Reaching that balance can be difficult, but we believe it is worth the effort.

Richard H. Savel is coeditor in chief of the American Journal of Critical Care. He is director, surgical critical care at Maimonides Medical Center and a professor of clinical medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, both in New York City.
Cindy L. Munro is coeditor in chief of the American Journal of Critical Care. She is associate dean
for research and innovation at the University of South Florida, College of Nursing, Tampa, Florida.

About Karly A.

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